Thursday, November 02, 2017
Mayo Clinic researchers find brain tumors gain an edge by commandeering normal growth proteins

What makes some brain cancers so hard to treat? Researchers in the laboratory of Alfredo Quiñones-Hinojosa, M.D., chair of Neurologic Surgery on Mayo Clinic’s Florida campus, looked at devastating brain tumors known as chordomas to understand why those tumors are capable of growing so aggressively. In a study published online today in Cell Reports, they found the tumors do their dirty work by hijacking growth machinery that exists in stem cells. Stem cells—the undifferentiated cells capable of turning into any cell in the body—have two particular proteins that are activated when the body is first developing. These proteins are responsible for growing the body’s organs, but the proteins become inactive after the organs reach the appropriate size. However, chordomas manage to co-opt those proteins and use them to thrive. ..

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Thursday, November 02, 2017
Mayo Clinic researchers to get closer look at the brain’s pathways in Alzheimer’s disease

Researchers have long known that genetics play a role in causing the dementia of Alzheimer’s disease, but genes, it turns out, are only part of the story. What’s come to light over the last several years is the incredible complexity of the disease, which involves not only genetic factors but also the vasculature of the brain. It’s not clear, however, what goes wrong within the cells of the brain’s blood vessels, how they accumulate clumps of toxic proteins, or how that process contributes to cognitive decline. A team of researchers on Mayo Clinic’s campus in Florida has received a grant of $3.5 million from the National Institute on Aging (NIA), of the National Institutes of Health, to better understand the interconnected genetic and vascular pathways involved in Alzheimer’s. ..

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Thursday, November 02, 2017
FIT: 3-D Printed Ligaments May Be an Ideal Way to Repair Injured Knees

Florida Institute of Technology-led research into 3-D printed tissue may eventually yield an ideal way to treat ACL injuries, which affect 150,000 Americans each year, according to The American Orthopedic Society for Sports Medicine. ..

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Tuesday, October 31, 2017
FIU: Superbugs have a new foe

The National Institutes of Health awarded FIU researchers nearly $2 million to study how targeting bacterial DNA can be used to kill antibiotic-resistant superbugs. ..

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Monday, October 30, 2017
USF: Fish Consumption Offers Same Protection in Preventing Childhood Asthma as Fish Oil Supplements

Researchers at the USF just published a scientific review of two studies that conclude children whose mothers consume high-dose omega-3 fatty acids daily during the third trimester are less likely to develop such breathing problems. ..

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Thursday, October 26, 2017
UF Health, USF and FIU to study effects of marijuana on HIV symptoms

A grant from the National Institute on Drug Abuse will help support an extensive new study on marijuana's health effects in those who suffer from HIV infection. ..

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Thursday, October 26, 2017
UM: Blues and Reds Game To Aid Research

The puzzle game, developed by two economics professors at the UM School of Business Administration, is intended to help researchers better understand which interactive problems players are able to solve and, consequently, to discover what makes one interactive problem more complex than another.  ..

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Saturday, October 14, 2017
USF neuroscientist probes how different states of tau may drive brain cell damage

Research by Laura Blair’s team may lead to targeted treatments for Alzheimer’s, Parkinson’s and other neurodegenerative diseases  ..

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Wednesday, October 11, 2017
Moffitt Researchers Discover New Targets for Approved Cancer Drug

A team of researchers at Moffitt Cancer Center used cellular drug screening, functional proteomics and computer-based modeling to determine whether drugs with well-known targets may be repurposed for use against other biological targets.  ..

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Tuesday, October 10, 2017
TPIMS: Battling the Opioid Epidemic

Torrey Pines Institute for Molecular Sciences is currently working on a series of projects that could provide substantial treatment to those who are affected by this crisis.  ..

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