Thursday, November 02, 2017
Mayo Clinic researchers find brain tumors gain an edge by commandeering normal growth proteins

What makes some brain cancers so hard to treat? Researchers in the laboratory of Alfredo Quiñones-Hinojosa, M.D., chair of Neurologic Surgery on Mayo Clinic’s Florida campus, looked at devastating brain tumors known as chordomas to understand why those tumors are capable of growing so aggressively. In a study published online today in Cell Reports, they found the tumors do their dirty work by hijacking growth machinery that exists in stem cells. Stem cells—the undifferentiated cells capable of turning into any cell in the body—have two particular proteins that are activated when the body is first developing. These proteins are responsible for growing the body’s organs, but the proteins become inactive after the organs reach the appropriate size. However, chordomas manage to co-opt those proteins and use them to thrive. ..

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Thursday, November 02, 2017
Mayo Clinic researchers to get closer look at the brain’s pathways in Alzheimer’s disease

Researchers have long known that genetics play a role in causing the dementia of Alzheimer’s disease, but genes, it turns out, are only part of the story. What’s come to light over the last several years is the incredible complexity of the disease, which involves not only genetic factors but also the vasculature of the brain. It’s not clear, however, what goes wrong within the cells of the brain’s blood vessels, how they accumulate clumps of toxic proteins, or how that process contributes to cognitive decline. A team of researchers on Mayo Clinic’s campus in Florida has received a grant of $3.5 million from the National Institute on Aging (NIA), of the National Institutes of Health, to better understand the interconnected genetic and vascular pathways involved in Alzheimer’s. ..

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Tuesday, August 08, 2017
Sanford Burnham Prebys and Mayo Clinic Collaborators Awarded Multi-Year NIH Grant

A team of researchers at Sanford Burnham Prebys Medical Discovery Institute (SBP) at Lake Nona, Fla. and Mayo Clinic in Rochester, Minnesota have been awarded a three-year National Institutes of Health (NIH) grant which aims to identify molecules that could become new medicines to inhibit myocardial fibrosis.  ..

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Monday, May 01, 2017
Mayo Clinic researchers develop new tumor-shrinking nanoparticle to fight cancer, prevent recurrence

A Mayo Clinic research team has developed a new type of cancer-fighting nanoparticle aimed at shrinking breast cancer tumors, while also preventing recurrence of the disease. In the study, published today in Nature Nanotechnology, mice that received an injection with the nanoparticle showed a 70 to 80 percent reduction in tumor size. Most significantly, mice treated with these nanoparticles showed resistance to future tumor recurrence, even when exposed to cancer cells a month later. ..

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Wednesday, March 01, 2017
Mayo Clinic publishes genetic screen for Alzheimer’s in African-Americans

A Mayo Clinic research team has found a new gene mutation that may be a risk factor for late-onset Alzheimer’s disease in African-Americans. This is the first time this gene has been implicated in the development of this disease in this population.  ..

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Monday, February 20, 2017
Blast off: Stem cells from Mayo Clinic physician’s lab launch into space

Consider it one physician’s giant leap for mankind. The latest rocket launch from NASA’s Kennedy Space Center in Cape Canaveral, Florida, included a payload of several samples of donated adult stem cells from a research laboratory at Mayo Clinic’s Florida campus. ..

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Wednesday, February 01, 2017
Mayo researchers identify mechanism of oncogene action in lung cancer

Researchers at Mayo Clinic have identified a genetic promoter of cancer that drives a major form of lung cancer. In a new paper published this week in Cancer Cell, Mayo Clinic researchers provide genetic evidence that Ect2 drives lung adenocarcinoma tumor formation. ..

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Wednesday, December 14, 2016
Mayo Clinic finds surprising results on first-ever test of stem cell therapy to treat arthritis

Researchers at Mayo Clinic’s campus in Florida have conducted the world’s first prospective, blinded and placebo-controlled clinical study to test the benefit of using bone marrow stem cells, a regenerative medicine therapy, to reduce arthritic pain and disability in knees. ..

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Thursday, December 01, 2016
Mayo Clinic finds myocarditis caused by infection on rise globally

Myocarditis, an assortment of heart disorders often caused by infection and inflammation, is known to be difficult to diagnose and treat. But the picture of who is affected is becoming a little clearer. ..

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Tuesday, November 22, 2016
Single mutation in recessive gene increases risk of earlier onset Parkinson’s disease

A collaboration of 32 researchers in seven countries, led by scientists at Mayo Clinic’s campus in Florida, has found a genetic mutation they say confers a risk for development of Parkinson’s disease earlier than usual. ..

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